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Review

As its name suggests, Inertial Drift is based on skidding through an atypical mechanic using the two analog sticks, one controlling the steering angle of the wheels, the other, the lateral force exerted on the car's ass by the magic gyroscope that equips it. The game offers a plethora of content, 20 tracks, 7 game modes, 16 wildly different...

Inertial Drift

  • Greg Burn
  • May 27, 2021

As its name suggests, Inertial Drift is based on skidding through an atypical mechanic using the two analog sticks, one controlling the steering angle of the wheels, the other, the lateral force exerted on the car's ass by the magic gyroscope that equips it.

The game offers a plethora of content, 20 tracks, 7 game modes, 16 wildly different cars, and multiplayer. 

The 20 tracks: there are 5 distinct environments, each offering a "short" circuit and a longer variation by reusing a part, being somewhat generous, we can talk about 10 tracks.

As for the game modes, apart from the style mode which focuses on your ability to burn rubber, they are all-time trial variations, simply because the game does not manage collisions between vehicles, and therefore cannot offer races as such. This may sound harsh, but the content offered is not bad considering the price and the studio behind it, but the publisher seems to have oversold the result somewhat.

If there is one element of communication that is not usurped, it is the furiously different cars. This is where the essence of the title is concentrated. The editor even pushes the analogy with the different characters of a fighting game, and it's not stolen: going from one car to another requires a complete re-learning of driving, an ordeal that is often frustrating because it clashes with the muscle memory developed on the previous car.

This singularity is only possible because of the unrealistic physics engine of the game, which some people will call arcade, others will call crazy. The game allows you to get a good idea of a small sports car with a flexible and permissive driving style.

If the atypical gameplay saves the furniture, it is difficult to make up for the weakness of the content and the abundance of small flaws, from the distressing story mode to the little varied music and a general lack of finish. It exudes love and goodwill, but a few more minutes in the kitchen wouldn't have hurt.

If you turn off the soundtrack and listen to Eurobeat, you can get a kick out of constantly optimizing your time, memorizing every curve, and choosing the best vehicle for each track, but apart from that, the meager content is unlikely to keep you going for more than a handful of hours.

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