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Review

Monster Hunter is a third-person action game, playable in solo and in cooperation, in which the player faces, in perilous and complex fights, monsters that are often between 3 and 15 times his size. Each confrontation is a macabre tango in which only your skills and your instinct will decide, who of the man or the beast, will come out alive. Yeah,...

MONSTER HUNTER RISE

  • Greg Burn
  • May 30, 2021

Monster Hunter is a third-person action game, playable in solo and in cooperation, in which the player faces, in perilous and complex fights, monsters that are often between 3 and 15 times his size. Each confrontation is a macabre tango in which only your skills and your instinct will decide, who of the man or the beast, will come out alive. Yeah, nothing else! The whole dance revolves around a vast selection of weapons divided into 14 categories, each with its gameplay. 

Japan is in the spotlight! Exit the globe-bulge a little messy but charming of World, here, we leave in full trip in the country of the ninjas, the bamboos, and the katanas. And how refreshing it is. You might as well forget about a scenario that is even more anecdotal than World (which at least had the merit of trying something), to focus on the technical qualities of the object. And there, everything borders on prowess. 

However, we read here and there that Monster Hunter Rise was the most accessible Monster Hunter. Big mistake! If overall, the object is simpler than its predecessor thanks to a lot of gadgets and additions that are more tolerant towards the player, one can only be offended by the wall of tutorial popups that the game throws in our face, where World (once again) took more time to introduce its mechanics. It is in this area that we even notice some regressions, such as this much more basic training area or these tutorials on the use of weapons that have disappeared from the fields of honor. 

The purification of the Monster Hunter formula continues, mostly for the better, but we can't help but look at the latest one with a perplexed eye, despite its immense qualities. What we gained in this opus in the agility of execution and freedom of movement, we lost in immersion. You don't need to catch your breath anymore, and neither do the monsters. What this Monster Hunter sometimes lacks are the moments of breathing, of sighing that its elders managed to offer us. In a fight where man is taking over the beast, we could use some.

Despite all the speed that Capcom injects into Rising to make it a faster, more violent, more nervous game, it paradoxically forces us to look behind us a bit. We then realize that by rushing too much towards the fight, the little one loses a feeling that was dear to us: that of being a hunter. Still, it's an extremely solid entry, on which we grumble a lot, but we can't get out of it since the release.

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